Missions History

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But Christ multiplies himself through the self-multiplication of the individual Christian. He has kindled his light in our souls that we may give that light to others. How long it has taken us to realize that the command to “Go” is addressed not to official servants, but to all Christians, and that Christ’s purpose is...
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It is essential that the leaders of the Church in the home lands as well as on the mission field regard the evangelization of the world as a primary obligation and devote themselves to its accomplishment. The present attitude of the Church and the plans of her leaders are certainly not consistent with a deep...
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An enterprise which aims at the evangelization of the whole world in a generation, and contemplates the ultimate establishment of the Kingdom of Christ, requires that its leaders be Christian statesmen—men with far-seeing views, with comprehensive plans, with power of initiative and with victorious faith. While the call to evangelize was addressed to the whole...
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Over the years most interpreters have tended to assume that since the ultimate fulfillment of the words about blessing to all the families of the earth was to be in the coming of the Messiah, therefore we should not look for much fulfillment before then. Ralph Winter called this assumption, “The Theory of the Hibernating...
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If we are to have more missionary pastors the subject of missions must receive larger attention in the theological seminaries. Chairs of missions should be established and filled only by men possessing both scientific attainments and a passion for the world’s evangelization. Students should be required to make an exhaustive study of the moral and...
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It is ironic that at the time of its founding, one of its visionaries, Arthur T. Pierson (1837–1911), had issued a warning in his book The Crisis of Missions about liberal theology which would ultimately become the undoing of the movement. At that very time modernistic rationalism was just getting a foothold in the seminaries...
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Though in most every external aspect the life of John R. Mott seemed to be that of a typical religious youth, Mott’s plans and ambitions were in fact resting on an internal religious conflict, as he related in his later life. The talented and practical-minded Mott had great ambitions for a successful career in business...
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The Student Volunteer Movement began in 1886 under the leadership of John R. Mott. During the next fifty years it was instrumental in sending 20,500 college graduates to the field. Most were from the United States. Never before in history had so many highly educated persons, women as well as men, volunteered for missionary service....
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The missionary pastor has abandoned the merely occasional missionary sermon, and makes missions the fibre and substance of his teaching. Much personal effort is put forth in his parish. The missionary work is thoroughly organized. Scriptural habits of giving are cultivated. The people are taught to offer continual prayer for the extension of the Kingdom...
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Mr. Robert E. Speer, in his pamphlet, “Prayer and Missions,” which has done so much to awaken the Church to prayer, goes to the heart of the subject: “The evangelization of the world in this generation depends first of all upon a revival of prayer. Deeper than the need for men; deeper, far, than the...
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