Missions History

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Where ever the Christian wins the victory over selfishness and avarice and renounces the thought of centering his affections on this world as his home, there is developed world-conquering power. This call to self-denial and liberality comes to all who bear the name of Christ. To not a few it will mean to go on...
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On the spirituality of the missionary more than upon any other one factor on the mission field depends the evangelization of the world. Far more vital than the physical, social, and intellectual equipment of the missionary is his spiritual furnishing. It is supremely and indispensably important that he be a man filled with the spirit...
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It was a bivocational Baptist pastor named William Carey who played such a pivotal missions mobilization role that he is often called the father of the modern missionary movement. Carey’s burden for global mission began in the early 1790s after reading explorer Captain Cook’s writings. Carey started talking with Baptist church leaders about the need to send...
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Today in Baptist History class at the Our Generation Training Center, I was reminded about a missionary hero of mine, William Carey. What the man accomplished was nothing short of incredible. John Ryland, the minister that baptized William, wrote in his journal that day, “baptized today poor journeyman shoe cobbler.” But the man that Carey...
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This church appears to have been raised up by the labours of Jesse Peter, a black preacher of very respectable talents, and an amiable character. It was constituted in 1793, by elders Abraham Marshall and David Tinsley. Jesse Peter, sometimes called Jesse Golfin, on account of his master’s name, continued the pastor of this church...
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By KudzuVine – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7434093 The origin of this church, according to Rippon’s Register and Holcombe’s Repository, was in the following manner. About the beginning of the American war, George Leile, sometimes called George Sharp, but more commonly known among his brethren and friends by the name of brother George, began to...
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(1721–1808) Few Moravian missionaries suffered more in their labors for Christ than did this native Zauchtenthal. For 62 years he devoted himself to the native Americans, sharing in all of the uncertainties that beset their fragile existence during the time of territorial expansion and the Revolutionary War. Zeisberger’s parents fled persecution in Moravia and found...
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Of his conversion George Liele wrote: “I was convinced that I was not in the way to heaven, but in the way to hell. This state I laboured under for the space of five or six months.… I was brought to perceive that my life hung by a slender thread, … and I found no...
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After about two years of worship at Brampton, Rev. Thomas Burton, an elderly Baptist preacher, and Rev. Abraham Marshall visited this little slave church and gave them two certificates. The first certificate constituted this little plantation mission an official Christian church and read as follows: This is to certify that upon examination into the experiences...
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On some plantations, the laws restricting the open evangelistic strides of black preachers were gradually ignored by generous or kindhearted masters. The pulpit vitality of certain black preachers or “exhorters” was so potent that white Baptist churches were no longer able to contain them. Hence, the emergence of independent black Baptist churches gradually appeared on...
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